Response to tutor feedback for Assignment 5

I found my tutor feedback for Assignment 5 very encouraging. I was especially interested in the comments about composition and the balance of positive and negative space reflecting the balance of the figure on the edge of the sofa. I had not articulated this to myself but I think in playing around with the composition of this work I was drawn to a composition which reflected this balance.

My tutor also commented that I hadn’t reflected on how other artists had informed my work. This was an omission on my part. I was strongly influenced by Elizabeth Peyton’s composition. I suddenly noticed during this assignment Peyton’s amazing use of composition and colour. Her figures are usually cropped in interesting ways. I intend to look at Peyton’s drawings again, breaking down her work into areas to inform my own approach to composition.

I wasn’t able to follow up on my tutor’s suggestions about further study within the timeframe for assessment but I will do the following as part of my general art practice:

  • Take time to analyse composition of work by artists who appeal to me (and maybe some who don’t!)
  • Use gallery visits more effectively to feed into my own practice. Using sketches, note-taking, reflection.
  • Revisit my reflection and review my artist’s statement. My tutor says: ” I encourage you to focus more upon what you feel you are / want to explore furthervisual language, content / subject, quality of tone (emotional / psychological…) and choose a few very pertinent artists to reflect on.”
  • Look at Degas’ monotypes and combination of mono / pastel / charcoal.
  • Regarding conveying a sense of movement, passage of time:
  • Francis Alys Layered, taped, tracing paper drawings.William Kentridge, Patricia March, Susan Rothenberg cartwheel, spinning drawings / paintings, Sally Mann Interesting in relation to the controversial use of / ‘manipulation’ of portrayal of her children
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Tutor feedback for Assignment 5

Overall Comments

Thank you for the care taken in preparing and organising your portfolio.  One A5 sketchbook; five pages, A4 sketchbook; 8 pages (son).  A3 sketchbook; five pages (self-portraits).  The log was available and up to date.  I will comment upon specific aspects under the key headings.

You utilised a broad range of dry and wet media within the preliminary stages and final outcome.

An interesting and inventive approach to composition, informed by experimentation and use of photographic methods (cropping-in). This shows confidence in your understanding and application of compositional devices.

An interesting and personal inquiry into your son and the ‘enigma of childhood’.  You explored this through a process of drawing, reflecting, visual and critical inquiry.  

Good use of research in terms of the figure, and specifically referencing photography as a resource, drawing upon a diversity of sources.

With regard to your emailed selection for assessment.  We can discuss this via Hangout on Wednesday 6th at 5.30pm.  

Do refer back to the assessment criteria and Guidance for Assessment on editing and selecting.  It is important that you consider what you feel is your best work (not necessarily evidence from each assignment).

Well done.

Assignment 5 Assessment potential

“I understand your aim is to go for the B.A (Hons) Fine Art Degree and that you plan to submit your work for assessment at the end of this course. From the work you have shown in this assignment, providing you commit yourself to the course, I believe you have the potential to succeed at assessment. In order to meet all the assessment criteria, there are certain areas you will need to focus on, which I will outline in my feedback.”

assessment (see Conditions of Enrolment, Section 2 a). Contact the OCA Course Advisors to discuss this further.

Feedback on assignment

Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Quality of Outcome, Demonstration of Creativity

In your sketchbook and the preliminary pastels you challenge yourself by experimenting with a variety of possible compositions.  These include some intensive cropping of your son tumbling.  In relation to when you began the course, this reflects well on your learning, understanding and confidence.  

On a pragmatic level; I get a sense that you have struggled at times, to set yourself a plan of progression and timescale, that supports you in fully experimenting with your range of visual language and mark-making.  In future it would be acceptable and beneficial to use similar format / structure to the assignment, which you felt worked best.  

There is something arresting and interesting in the bold composition of the final A1 drawing.  It seems to reflect the notion of your son’s ‘absorption in his world / activity’ and what you described as your exclusion from his.  What is interesting is that the peculiar cropping, intrigues the viewer, I found this worked best when looking at the drawing vertically and from a distance of around 6’.

The balance and weight between the negative and positive space of the drawing holds the attention and reflects that sense of the act of him physically balancing (precariously) on the edge os the sofa.  Perhaps this was intentional (or maybe not on a conscious level), either-way it is worth considering this relationship in future drawings.  (Pointers)

With regard to the composition, you don’t specifically mention any influences, yet I wonder if subconsciously the Saville’s have informed you here?  You refer to creating a sense of ‘intimacy’ in the composition, which I would agree with, whilst also in contradiction excludes, with his back to us.

There are elements of the drawing which I find distracting (particularly) ; the wrists, back of hands and the shoulder blades .  These are better perceived and drawn in the A4 sketchbook; pencil / pastel drawing.  It also looks as though you have truncated the wrist and hand (left hand of drawing) to squeeze them into the picture plane.  Review the drawing by looking at it through a mirror.  Try and re-draw these elements in the drawing.  (Pointers)

In your reflection you comment upon how you could have been more experimental in your final piece, yet don’t suggest how.  I agree with your comment; as there are elements in the sketchbook  (see under Sketchbook), where you get a sense of your son’s vitality and explorations of his physicality through play.  I would have liked to have seen more of these experiments.  These you explored in relation to some smudging and overlaid pencil lines.  it might have been interesting to also consider other ways of conveying movement sequentially or in layers.  Have a look at how Francis Alys explores this in his taped, torn and layered tracings. (Pointers)

Sketchbooks

Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Demonstration of Creativity

Exploration of qualities of movement using charcoal, masking fluid, hard and soft pencils.  

Experimentation with composition regarding tumbling son.  Noticing the potential dynamic of the diagonal figure cutting across the picture plane.  There’s a strong sense of weight, gravity and energy to these compositions; pencil with warm pastel and 138 opposite.  Here you portray a spontaneous, energetic play and shifting limbs and feet.

Testing-out of cropping devices to explore more abstract elements in the frame, brings an ambiguity to the scene.  An interesting experiment, especially in relation to your thoughts on the enigma of childhood and your son being ‘in his world’.  There is something you have intuited here, that is very interesting, about the ability of children to be completely absorbed in their own body, mind and space.

It could have been beneficial for you to have extended your prep stage to more fully explore some of these qualities of composition and a range of mark-making and line to convey that sense of shifting, fidgeting and movement.  Perhaps utilising the smudging and erasing with the differing qualities of pencil / charcoal line overlaid.  (Pointers)

 

Research

Context, reflective thinking, critical thinking, analysis

 

A broad and diverse range of artists referred to on your log.

 

You researched across a range of secondary source material; books, blogs and articles (well Harvard referenced).  

 

((!)) You also visited exhibitions at the Tate and the Basquiat exhibition.  You made some concise comments on a number of 20th and 21st Century artists practicing across representation and abstraction.  It could have been useful for you to visually analyse (or even draw from) to compare and contrast a few examples.  Asking what you may learn from them in terms of visual language. construction of composition, picture plane, colour / monochrome, mark-making etc.  Some genuine reflections and comments upon your alienation regarding Basquiat’s visual language, symbols and references.  I wonder if you could have found some elements or aspects from your visits that may feed into your own work.  This is an element that you could consider as you progress; how can you regularly visually and materially, draw upon your research to feed into, apply and inform your work?  (Pointers)

 

Your research on Mullins triggered some interesting thoughts regarding the utilisation (and validity) of photography in art practice.  You make a distinctive point regarding your intention to explore not only your son, yet specific aspects of childhood, within the context of the assignment.  This is an interesting perspective and given more time would be worth you exploring further.

 

You researched into artists who convey a sense of movement or shifting in physicality.  You mention Degas in passing and I wonder if you have looked specifically at his monotypes, in and of themselves and also in combination with pastel and charcoal.  This is a simple technique which could help you to portray those qualities of blurring and expand on your mark-making potential.  (Pointers)

 

Good, consistent practice of Harvard referencing throughout.

 

Learning Logs or Blogs/Critical essays

Context, reflective thinking, critical thinking, analysis

 

Good use of your log to archive, critically reflect on your research and developing processes.

 

It is clear that your aims, intentions and focus shifted; as you worked on the assignment. This in turn has affected the outcome which has an ambiguity that is very interesting and less literal than your previous drawing at assn. 4.  You started off by focussing solely on drawing a sense of movement in your son’s limbs, this led to broader concerns regarding; the enigma of childhood and your evolving relationship with your son.  These are rich avenues of inquiry which I hope you will develop further in the future.

 

I invite you to revisit your reflection and review your artist’s statement.  I encourage you to focus more upon what you feel you are / want to explore further: visual language, content / subject, quality of tone (emotional / psychological…) and choose a few very pertinent artists to reflect on.  (Pointers)

 

Your research references both primary and secondary sources with good breadth and diversity.  

 

Good use of Harvard referencing..

 

Were there any specific artists (apart from Degas) who directly informed this assignment, as I couldn’t see any commentary if so.  It would be interesting and useful for you to elaborate on which particular research (and why / how) fed into the content and visual development of the assignment.  Consider this and add your response to your log.  (Pointers)

 

Your sense of questioning; of what you are doing, thinking and researching has been a useful, purposeful and sound practice throughout the unit.  Do continue to draw on and practice this as you progress.

 

Suggested reading/viewing

Context

 

Degas’ monotypes and combination of mono / pastel / charcoal.

 

Regarding conveying a sense of movement, passage of time:

Francis Alys Layered, taped, tracing paper drawings.

William Kentridge

Patricia March

Susan Rothenberg cartwheel, spinning drawings / paintings

Sally Mann Interesting in relation to the controversial use of / ‘manipulation’ of portrayal of her children.

 

Pointers for the next assignment

 

  • Reflect critically on this feedback in your learning log.

 

 

  • More exploration in your sketchbook or on loose sheets at the prep stage would help you to expand on your visual language by drawing upon a wider range of mark-making and qualities of line- in relation to your aims.

 

  • Explore a sense of weight, balance, harmony / disharmony in the shifting of negative and positive space, as well as the cropping-in devices of composition.

 

  • Try and re-draw the wrist, hand and shoulders, first review the drawing in a mirror.  Do some small studies on loose paper.  Then redraw in the final pastel drawing.

 

  • ((!)) Each time you research: primary and secondary sources; ask yourself what you understand from the text / image / experience and what you might draw upon and utilise to feed back into your own work.

Strengths and weaknesses – further development

My tutor has suggested I make bullet points of ways to develop my strengths and address my weaknesses

Strengths

  • Analysis of my own and other artists’ work. Develop further by connecting other artists’ work to my own.
  • Experimenting with line, composition, media. Continue to experiment and focus on what works and what doesn’t. Make more frequent sketches.
  • Develop my sketchbook work using more notations, testing or marks, palette and tonal values. Use what I learn to set aims at the assignment outcome stage
  • Do more analysis of other artists and how they relate to outcomes I want to achieve.

Weaknesses

  • Tonal contrasts. Practice working with darker tones
  • Be more focussed and specific about the connections I am making in my research. Use bullet points and set out aims relating to my own work.

Response to Tutor Feedback on Assignment 3

I found my tutor’s feedback really helpful and encouraging as I found Part 3 very challenging.  I feel I have almost grasped some of the practices I have struggled with including:

  • exploring composition more in my preliminary sketches
  • taking the work of other artists and incorporating ideas into my own practice
  • setting a concept or parameter for a subject to direct my work (I’m still finding this difficult) and exploring this in my sketchbook.

I think these are the areas I am weakest and will continue to work on these areas when working towards the next assignment. I will also look at tonal contrasts which is an area my tutor picked up on as needing more work.

I am glad that my own reflections on the Assignment are described as “insightful” and that I seem to be on the right track when analysing my own work and the work of other artists. I will also continue to network with other artists where possible.

My tutor gave me pointers which I intend to work on over the coming weeks. I find it quite hard to adopt new habits although I do think I am gradually taking my tutor’s advice on board! They are as follows:

  • From your analysis and insights: Make some clear, bullet-points as to what you aim to develop further (strengths) and what you wish to improve .  Keep referring to these as you progress through the next assignment.
  • Be more focused and specific about what you are making connections with in your research.  Draw out the specific points or connections you wish to explore and develop in your own work- make bullet points and set some aims.
  • Your tonal values are still limited at the dense, darker end; try and explore these much more through heavier gestural marks, swathes of ink or wash or built up through dense areas of marks or line.  To review these tonal qualities view the drawing through half-closed eyes, turn the drawing upside down and try viewing them in a mirror.  
  • I recommend that you continue to use your sketchbook regularly by exploring composition, mark-making and palette: monochrome & colour.  Try and use more notations, testing of marks, palette and tonal values.  Make sure that what you learn from this process you set aims to develop at the assignment outcome stage.  
  • Post photos of your visual refs to sketchbook / blog with brief notations (see Sketchbook comment)
  • Further analyse the Doig / Berg paintings I recommend, using the specific elements.  How might this analysis help you to understand possible composition, use of mark-making, palette and depth / surface qualities.  How do their and Virtue’s work explore notions of abstraction, that you say you’d like to explore.

 

Peter Doig regarding his compositional devices: 3rds and horizontal / vertical reflections. I also think you may find interest in his juxtapositioning when representing depth, whilst also reinforcing (painting’s) surface. Analyse these aspect of the works alongside the rich mark-making qualities, surface pattern and monochrome / high-key palette.

The Architect’s House in the Ravine

White Canoe

Ski Jacket

Reflection

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/jul/27/peter-doig-scottish-gallery-interview

Adrian Berg look at and analyse his Gloucester Gate, Regent’s Park May 1980 series. There’s a strong sense of composition, mark-making and palette.  I believe there are some connections between Berg and Doig’s composition, palette and use of mark-making.

John Virtue in relation to landscape and abstraction.  This particular article by Simon Schama is of interest for various reasons, but specifically what he attempts to convey through landscape and his influences.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2005/feb/28/art

 

Tutor Feedback on Assignment 3

20170602_120407

Overall Comments

Thank you for the care taken in editing, selecting and organising your portfolio.  This contained the assignment outcome, two examples from exercises, one course sketchbooks (with organised Post-Its) and one ‘creative sketchbook’. I will comment upon specific aspects under the key headings and briefly comment on the ‘creative sketchbook’.

In relation to you reflecting on and responding to feedback at assigment 2: there is evidence of you acting on most of the Research and Pointers suggested.  This has clearly fed into and informed your approach to the assignment preliminary sketches; developing your options for viewing, composition, mark-making and cropping techniques.

In your sketchbook it’s good to see you using notations, sketches to prepare for your assignment,.  You’re beginning to explore and develop confidence in a variety of approaches to exercises and your preparatory work.  There are some energetic, dynamic line compositions (townscape / landscape) and stretching your own comfort zones away from the central compositional focus.

You’ve experimented with a broad range of media including: charcoal, pencils, Inktense, masking fluid and inks to expand on your mark-making, representation of depth, composition and form.

A developing analysis and reflection, with a more evenly balanced critique of what works and what doesn’t work, with some intentions on how you can move forward and bring these insights to future work.

As you progressed to the  assignment itself you evidenced a pertinent, concise and focused approach to your preparation, research and brought what you’d learned from the process.  It is clear that you are more readily applying your learning to each subsequent stage of your development: on an intuitive and conscious level.

Your research and analysis on specific artists and on composition has helped you to move away from habits, to see and understand a greater range of options and possibilities for your own work.

You have developed in confidence in terms of how you are thinking about research, planning and preparation with some persona aims coming to bear.

Well done.

Assignment 3 Assessment potential

“I understand your aim is to go for the B.A (Hons) Fine Art Degree and that you plan to submit your work for assessment at the end of this course. From the work you have shown in this assignment, providing you commit yourself to the course, I believe you have the potential to succeed at assessment. In order to meet all the assessment criteria, there are certain areas you will need to focus on, which I will outline in my feedback.”

Feedback on assignment

Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Quality of Outcome, Demonstration of Creativity

You undertook some good professional networking in order to create an opportunity to draw plein-air with others, create opportunities for discussion, feedback and future exhibition opportunities.  Good practice.

Your prep drawings helped you to expand on compositional and mark-making options.  The panoramic drawing was especially interesting.  Rather than discarding the ‘spiky plant’ it may have worked to radically increase it’s scale, to create a greater sense of depth the the work.

The research and analysis into composition has informed your own understanding and increased confidence in exploring and experimenting further.  (see Pointers / Research)

I tend to agree with your reflections on the final outcome as in the aspects where you’ve explore mark-making and wash with the masking-fluid, do work well and the use of the vertical post of the pergola creates an interesting vertical frame in the drawing.  

Weaknesses are the ‘bodged’ top of the drawing, the vague patch at the middle right hand side and too much detail in bottom right.  Your tonal values need exploring at the darker, denser end of the range especially when conveying depth and distinctive shadows.  (see Pointers)

Other than wishing to convey, ‘plants, structure and depth’, I wonder if you had any other aims or intentions?  What might these be about landscape, nature…?

You utilised a broad range of media: charcoal, ink, masking fluid and pencil in some areas creating abstract shapes suggesting distant trees, loose varied marks to suggest foliage and undergrowth.

Sketchbooks

Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Demonstration of Creativity

Of particular interest are a number of pages in the course sketchbook. The ones specifically relating to the assignment with varied compositions- panoramic, use of 3rds and large ‘spiky plant’ in right hand 3rd: an interesting layout.  Look at Adrian Berg to see how he structured some of his Regent’s Park works (paintings and watercolour sketches).  Further look at and analyse Peter Doig and John Virtue (see Research / Viewing / Pointers).

You mention that you utilised photographs to provide references for composition and other visual elements; it would be useful if you posted these to your blog or in your sketchbook with brief notations of how they were useful.  Just helps me to see how you are using and translating information from photo – drawings.  (see Pointers).

Utilise your sketchbook on a more regular basis, if possible everyday.  Use notations, explore mark-making with/ without masking-fluid and especially extent your tonal values, explore the more fluid and dynamic linear qualities in sketches.  You are touches on a range of interesting visual language and notions- if possible just do and practice more regularly.  (see Pointers)

{ ‘Creative sketchbook’ }:

Though not linked to the coursework….

‘Purposeful’ use of the sketchbook is an important phrase.  Ask what you want to use it for, how using it will help you experiment, explore and develop your visual language and your ideas and thinking process.

Creating surface on which to draw / paint can be useful / interesting, it can look contrived too.  It depends on the nature and purpose of the sketchbook.  Is the surface, insert, collage part of the ‘idea’ or does it distract or seem to make things look ‘arty’ or ‘attractive’ with little content?

The page with the paint refs and notations and two shells seems to work, as do the page of four shells, the page with bullet points down the left-side and the large loose drawing and collaged sections ‘Kitty Sabatier’ and large shell with text opposite.  There are definitely elements to incorporate into your sketchbooks with an understanding of what elements are important for you to draw on and explore.

Research

Context, reflective thinking, critical thinking, analysis

A very diverse, yet pertinent range of research including historical and current practitioners.  There is evidence that this is informing how you think, analyse, critically reflect and make decisions- benefitting your drawing practice.  

A good range of both primary and secondary sources.  Actively seeking out OCA study days, workshops, exhibitions and online sources.

Not yet consistently analysing and then applying what you research to your own ideas, concerns and practice.  Try and practice this more and foreground the relationship between what you’re researching- ask what connections there may be with how you’re practicing now, and how you hope to develop.  (see Pointers)

Good, consistent practice of Harvard referencing throughout.

See Research / Viewing / Pointers

Learning Logs or Blogs/Critical essays

Context, reflective thinking, critical thinking, analysis

A concise yet thoughtfully, insightful reflection on the assignment itself.  You reference each criteria and analyse how you address them; well and not so well.  You go further by saying how you aim to take these findings forward to develop your work further.

The clarity and confidence in your analysis and thinking is developing, and it’s good to read your balanced sense of your strengths and qualities, whilst also commenting in brief on what doesn’t work so well- setting some clear aims to address these.  A much more useful way of approaching the work and gaining recognition of both elements, then setting clear aims for developing and improving both.  This is a really valuable and important shift in your perspective. (Pointers)

Consistently good critical analysis of your drawings and a concise yet purposeful reflective process.  Continue this as you progress.

Suggested reading/viewing

Context

Peter Doig regarding his compositional devices: 3rds and horizontal / vertical reflections. I also think you may find interest in his juxtapositioning when representing depth, whilst also reinforcing (painting’s) surface. Analyse these aspect of the works alongside the rich mark-making qualities, surface pattern and monochrome / high-key palette.

The Architect’s House in the Ravine

White Canoe

Ski Jacket

Reflection

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/jul/27/peter-doig-scottish-gallery-interview

Adrian Berg look at and analyse his Gloucester Gate, Regent’s Park May 1980 series. There’s a strong sense of composition, mark-making and palette.  I believe there are some connections between Berg and Doig’s composition, palette and use of mark-making.

John Virtue in relation to landscape and abstraction.  This particular article by Simon Schama is of interest for various reasons, but specifically what he attempts to convey through landscape and his influences.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2005/feb/28/art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pointers for the next assignment

 

  • Reflect critically on this feedback in your learning log.

 

 

  • From your analysis and insights: Make some clear, bullet-points as to what you aim to develop further (strengths) and what you wish to improve .  Keep referring to these as you progress through the next assignment.

 

  • Be more focussed and specific about what you are making connections with in your research.  Draw out the specific points or connections you wish to explore and develop in your own work- make bullet points and set some aims.

 

 

  • Your tonal values are still limited at the dense, darker end; try and explore these much more through heavier gestural marks, swathes of ink or wash or built up through dense areas of marks or line.  To review these tonal qualities view the drawing through half-closed eyes, turn the drawing upside down and try viewing them in a mirror.  

 

  • I recommend that you continue to use your sketchbook regularly by exploring composition, mark-making and palette: monochrome & colour.  Try and use more notations, testing of marks, palette and tonal values.  Make sure that what you learn from this process you set aims to develop at the assignment outcome stage.  

 

  • Post photos of your visual refs to skethbook / blog with brief notations (see Sketchbook comment)

 

  • Further analyse the Doig / Berg paintings I recommend, using the specific elements.  How might this analysis help you to understand possible composition, use of mark-making, palette and depth / surface qualities.  How do their and Virtue’s work explore notions of abstraction, that you say you’d like to explore.

 

 

Please inform me of how you would like your feedback for the next assignment.   Written or video/audio

 

Well done, you’ve developed in confidence since assignment 2.  I look forward to your assignment 4.

Response to feedback on Assignment 1

Assignment 1 Feedback is a comprehensive look at how I tackled my first assignment. As I work through Assignment 2 I will be attempting to incorporate this feedback in 4 main areas.

  1. Set my intention for an exercise. Find out where my interest is.
  2. Use prep sketches to look at how I can use tone, composition, etc. to express this intention
  3. Analyse what went well and why as well as areas of improvement. Try to take this into the next exercise/assignment.
  4. Continue research using recommended articles/resources

The feedback points out that I focus on the areas that I think need improvement rather than the areas where I am working well so I’ll round up the areas I’m working well first, then go on to areas I will be focusing on improving.

Areas I am working well

  • asking questions as I go on
  • good beginnings at experimenting with approaches, media and techniques
  • reflecting on observation and acquiring drawing skills
  • bringing in personal aims and ideas outside course material
  • learning from exercises
  • using thumbnail compositions to make quick, informed decisions
  • learning about composition from research and practice
  • Assignment 1 drawing contained: “some well-observed, sensitive mark-making across the jar and brushes and a subtle and simple approach to the ring and shell.”
  • “You have approached the assignment with thought and consideration with regard to choice of media, selection of objects in relation to your research and reflections on vanitas genre and also a personal narrative content.”
  • Good use of sketchbook to make prep drawings
  • Continue the succinct yet useful notations alongside prep drawings
  • Using my blog to reflect on my research

Areas to focus on improving

  • regular practice and exploration of techniques
  • look at tonal values during preparatory sketches
  • attempt to solve problems I find in my work, take that forward into planning work for the next exercise.
  • look at what works as well as what doesn’t
  • Expand upon sketchbook prep work by setting my own specific aims for the assignment. Draw in series – for example: 6-8 thumbnails to explore composition, tonal values and negative space; 4-6 thumbnails to explore how the object/subject sits or fills the page; 6-8 small loose drawings to explore mark-making qualities in relation to lighting/tonal qualities
  • Use the constructively critical way I approach others work in my analysis of my own work. See OCA study guide “Looking at Artists”
  • set some intentions and aims for my own work. Ask broad questions about my intentions when beginning a drawing and ask similar questions when looking at others work.
  • Harvard reference all research

Suggested reading/viewing

Context

www.drawingcenter.org  Research through current and past exhibitions.  Red Drawing Papers no: 128 Cecily Brown’s Rehearsal and Paper : 117 on ‘Small’ are good starting points.

https://drawingroom.org.uk/

‘FOUND’ Cornelia Parker curated exhibition ( Aug – Sept 2016) at The Foundling Museum.

Pointers for the next assignment

  • Reflect and act on the suggestions and recommendations throughout the feedback.
  • Set yourself some specific aims to apply to your own drawings.
  • Reflect upon both what works / what doesn’t work in equal measure- then set some aims to develop and enhance both aspects.
  • Expand upon the preparatory drawings: work across a number of thumbnail sketches to explore tonal values, relationship between object / subject and negative space, mark-making qualities (in addition to composition).
  • Suggested reading / viewing (as above) and reflect on these on your blog.

Feedback from Assignment 1 from Tutor Cheryl Huntbach

Overall Comments

Thank you for your submission of Assignment 1. You submitted a well organised and thoughtfully edited portfolio, a supporting blog archiving research and commentary on process, media and range of exercises.

Throughout the feedback I have made some recommendations on approaches to media, process and critical analysis: your work and research.  It will benefit your progress to act on these and reflect on the benefits or otherwise on your blog.

You have a methodical and committed approach to experimenting with different media and recording the process.  

You have made a good start to researching with reference to historical and 21st century research.  You ask questions of yourself and others, exploring a more open inquiry rather than sticking with assumption.

You’re using the blog to track your progress and to reflect upon your use of media and technique.  There is more scope to reflect on the connections between your breadth of research, your own learning and potential.

There are some experimental approaches to exploring tonal values in creating three-dimensional form.  In observing and conveying objects you have attempted to explore and communicate differing surface and material qualities.  You’re noticing and exploring how to communicate reflective and transparent matter.  Good beginings here, regular practice and further exploration will improve these effects.

In some of the drawings you pay more attention to the objects and less to the space in-between, foreground and background.  Here it would be beneficial to revisit some of your research: Morandi for example.

You are clearly reflecting on your observation and acquiring drawing skills with an open, inquiring approach .  At assignment 1 it is very good to see that you are bringing in some personal aims and projects outside of the course material.  

Assignment 1 Assessment potential

You may want to get credit for your hard work and achievements with the OCA by formally submitting your work for assessment at the end of the module. More and more people are taking the idea of lifelong learning seriously by submitting their work for assessment but it is entirely up to you. We are just as keen to support you whether you study for pleasure or to gain qualifications. Please consider whether you want to put your work forward for assessment and let me know your decision when you submit Assignment 2. I can then give you feedback on how well your work meets the assessment requirements.

Feedback on assignment

Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Quality of Outcome, Demonstration of Creativity

An expansive range of monochrome media has been utilised in the preparatory drawings and the final outcome.  

These work best when you’ve explored and conveyed  texture, surface and reflective qualities and form through specific mark-making and handling processes.  You’ve clearly reflected on and learned from the exercises and projects, which you’ve then fed into the assignment itself.

With regards to the preparatory works; you’ve explored differing compositions, mark-making qualities and varied tonal values (especially in the background / negative space).

Some simple, concise analysis on the thumbnail compositions has helped you to make quick, informed decisions.  You are clearly learning about composition from your research and practice.

In future consideration at the prep stage for the range of tonal values: in the background and foreground would also be useful. (see Pointers).  Half-closing eye at this stage may help you to break these down.  Also focussing upon the negative space only to first lay-down tonal values.

‘Lots of things that I’m not sure about in this picture’:  Being ‘unsure’ is a normal and acceptable state of being, especially when learning new processes and approaches.  

You make judgements on your work that suggest you’re dissatisfied with some elements, yet offer no problem solving or alternative approaches i.e: ‘messy’ background, edge of books and image too small.  Ask yourself how you might have planned: the composition, placement on the paper, the range, balance and dynamic of the tonal values across the work?  (see Pointers)

It would be useful to spend some time reflecting on the analysis of what works / doesn’t work- in equal balance.  Then set some aims as to how these might be developed further or addressed.  I suggest that this will be helpful to recognise both emerging strengths and qualities to be further explored, as well as weaknesses to be developed and problem-solved.  (see Pointers)

Some well-observed and sensitive mark-making across the jar and brushes.  You’ve captured and conveyed both a play of light and qualities of transparency in the jar.  There is a both a subtle and simple approach to the ring and shell.

You have approached the assignment with thought and consideration with regard to choice of media, selection of objects in relation to your research and reflections on vanitas genre and also a personal narrative content.

Sketchbooks

Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Demonstration of Creativity

Good use of your sketchbook to make notational prep drawing, with concise analysis of compositions.

It would benefit your development to expand upon this prep.  Set some specific aims of your own around the assignment work.  Pursue the prep by drawing in series before you begin a final drawing, for example:

6 – 8  small, thumbnail sketches to explore tonal values, negative space (in addition to different compositions or viewpoints)- work out the more interesting composition and tones before you start.

4 – 6 small, thumbnails to explore how the object / subject sits or fills the page.  Test out portrait / landscape format.

6 – 8  small loose drawings to explore mark-making qualities in relation to  lighting / tonal qualities- to test out the varying qualities of tone and marks across the drawing.  (see Pointers)

Continue the succinct yet useful notations alongside the prep drawings- these will aid your thinking and visual analysis at each stage of the planning and drawing process.

Research

Context, reflective thinking, critical thinking, analysis  

You’re using your blog well to reflect on your eclectic research.  A very diverse range of both primary and secondary sources.

Harvard referenced research.

You seem more constructively critical when analysing the work of others; considering elements that work / strengths and elements that don’t work / weaknesses.  How might you bring a similar balanced analysis to your own work?  Could you utilise the OCA study guide looking at artists… to your own work?  (see Pointers)

The research and inquiry is thoughtful, so now it is timely to think of how you might apply or reflect on the content, context and qualities in your own work?

Set some intentions and aims for your future drawings- applying your research to your work.  (see Pointers)

Learning Logs or Blogs/Critical essays

Context, reflective thinking, critical thinking, analysis  

You’ve made a good start to using your blog as an archive for your research, reflections and learning process.  Maintaining this practice whilst feeding your curiosity and exploring the practice of drawing is essential for your development.

You understand that there is no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ approach to drawing, though there’s a tendency to focus on what doesn’t work: this is a great opportunity to problem-solve.  In addition to not repeating the process or strategy,  consider how you might not do / do something else.  Follow this problem-solving by trying out your new ideas and approaches. (see Pointers)

You are using both trial & error, research and analysis to underpin and feed into your learning.  By reflecting on your blog regularly, this is supporting how you think and also how you draw.

You are reflecting on your learning throughout.  What would be useful is to take these thoughts and insights forward – Set yourself some specific aims to apply to your drawings.  This will help you to develop and deepen your autonomy and personal voice.  (see Pointers)

Begin to ask some broad questions / intentions (as suggested in Research) about what your intentions may be when beginning a drawing (& ask similar questions when reading or looking at others’ work).  Try this approach out and record your reflections on your blog.

Suggested reading/viewing

Context

www.drawingcenter.org  Research through current and past exhibitions.  Red Drawing Papers no: 128 Cecily Brown’s Rehearsal and Paper : 117 on ‘Small’ are good starting points.

https://drawingroom.org.uk/

‘FOUND’ Cornelia Parker curated exhibition ( Aug – Sept 2016) at The Foundling Museum.

Pointers for the next assignment

  • Reflect and act on the suggestions and recommendations throughout the feedback.
  • Set yourself some specific aims to apply to your own drawings.
  • Reflect upon both what works / what doesn’t work in equal measure- then set some aims to develop and enhance both aspects.
  • Expand upon the preparatory drawings: work across a number of thumbnail sketches to explore tonal values, relationship between object / subject and negative space, mark-making qualities (in addition to composition).
  • Suggested reading / viewing (as above) and reflect on these on your blog.

Please inform me of how you would like your feedback for the next assignment.   Written or video/audio

Well done, I look forward to your next assignment.